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Our Credit Card Zero Celebration!

(Originally published on The $76K Project on 7/6/2018)

First: We did it! We paid off the credit cards!

I'm still in semi-disbelief, but the credit card balances are now ALL at zero. The big moment happened the day before Independence Day.

Actually, it almost *didn't* happen, because the bonus we'd been planning to use for the final payoff didn't show up when it was supposed to. I got impatient, dragged the money over from our emergency fund, and insisted that we eliminate the remaining $1500 anyway. Boom! 

(Bonus arrived today, so I replenished the e-fund.)

The fact that we managed to meet this milestone, and well before we ever expected to, feels shocking in an is-this-really-happening (or as my former therapist would have coached me, did-we-really-make-this-happen) sort of way. It hasn't sunk in yet. Credit cards have been my ball-and-chain financial reality for so long that the idea of existing without carrying a balance seems... outside the realm of my understanding. And yet here we are!

As we mentioned a couple of posts ago, we're taking the month of July off from intensive debt repayment to celebrate our credit card win. This means that we'll be paying nothing beyond the minimums on our two student loans.  The rest of our disposable income will be used for a mini-vacation to the mountains and some kitchen supplies. 

Vacay means contending with the following expenses:

  • The cat needs to be boarded (because our friends are all away or not interested in hauling themselves across town to feed our charming little beast)
  • We need vacay lodging (I rented a somewhat reasonably-priced place through VRBO)
  • We'll be going out to eat more (but we'll also be eating meals at home in the rental)
  • We'll be doing some fun and not-free activities
Repeating to myself: I will keep it in budget. I will keep it in budget. I will keep it in budget.

Anyway, here's the July plan in all its messy glory.

July 2018 Budget:

Recurring Fixed Expenses:

  • Rent: $2100
  • Student loans: $650 
  • Phone bill: $78
  • Internet: $65
  • Auto and renter's insurance: $73
  • Thousand Trails: $108
  • Netflix: $13
Recurring Variable Expenses: 
  • Utilities: $180 (darn air conditioner... but it's been necessary the last couple of weeks)
  • Groceries: $800 (don't say it... I already know)
  • Gas in car: $150 (higher this month since we'll be road tripping)
  • Very Expensive Feline: $170 (boarding + vet fees - I am probably overestimating this)
  • Miscellaneous: $390
One-Time Expenses:
  • Vacation + home supplies: $1100
Total budget for July 2018: $5,877

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